Cradled in Caricature: Visual humour in satirical prints and drawings

 

CSoxeJaWEAEdXC4.jpg large

Earlier this month I visited Cradled in Caricature: Visual humour in satirical prints and drawings at The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.

The amusing exhibition features work from James Gillray, Glen Baxter and Hogarth. The show includes both humorous pictures and illustrations with a moral message.

It is hard to pick highlights from the exhibition as there are so many great pieces, but I was especially pleased to see two works by Glen Baxter after having looked at him whilst at art school.

The exhibition runs until 31st January 2016

 

Caroline Watson and Female Printmaking in Late Georgian England

wwrrt

Whilst at The Fitzwilliam Museum on Saturday I saw Caroline Watson and Female Printmaking in Late Georgian England. The exhibition shows prints by Caroline Watson, who is regarded as ‘the first British professional woman engraver’. She worked together with artists such as Sir Joshua Reynolds and used the techniques of stipple etching and aquatint.

Highlights include The Death of Cardinal Beaufort, stipple and etching after Sir Joshua Reynolds, (1792)In the exhibition there are two copies of this print, one with revisions made after Reynolds death, where the devil is removed from the image.

The exhibition is on until Sunday 4th January 2015

La Grande Guerre: French Prints of The First World War

aaaa

On Saturday I visited The Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge to see two exhibitions, the first being La Grande Guerre: French Prints of The First World War. The exhibition consisted of colour lithographs and woodcuts detailling the first seven months of World War I.

Highlights include, Dans le Bois de Augustow…, Un soldat allemand en feu... and Notre artillerie lourde… by Eduardo Garcia Benito.

The exhibition has since closed but is available to view online here

A visit to the Fitzwilliam Museum

BmO3S5yIcAAl3AW

Last weekend I visted the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge. As well as the vast art collection, I was able to see three exhibitions, ‘A World of Private Mystery: John Craxton’, ‘The Rampant Lions Press: A Letterpress Odyssey’ and ‘From Root to Tip: Botanical Art In Britain’.

The highlight for me was the Craxton exhibition. I had not come across his work before and I was really intrigued by the variation in style…bright and bold paintings to simple pencil drawings, both as impressive as each other. If you have not yet discovered John Craxton’s work I recommend looking him up, you can find out a bit more here.

The Rampant Lions Press exhibition has a lovely selection of letterpress pieces, most of which are typographical. My favourite piece from the exhibition was a book cover design by Sebastian Carter for The Tiger’s Bride. I definitely recommend this exhibition for people interested in printmaking, typography and artist books. The exhibition continues until 18th May.

‘From Root to Tip’ features watercolour paintings of plants by both professional and amateur artists. There are some beautiful images, my favourite was of a purple Iris. The exhibition continues until 11th May.